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Boletus Zelleri



Xerocomellus zelleri, commonly known as Zeller's bolete, is an edible species of mushroom in the family Boletaceae. First described scientifically by American mycologist William Alphonso Murrill in 1912, the species has been juggled by various authors to several genera, including Boletus, Boletellus, and Xerocomus. Found solely in western North America from British Columbia south to Mexico, the fruit bodies are distinguished by their dark reddish brown to nearly black caps with uneven surfaces, the yellow pores on the underside of the caps, and the red-streaked yellow stems. The fungus grows in summer and autumn on the ground, often in Douglas fir forests or on their margins. The development of the fruit bodies is gymnocarpic, meaning that the hymenium appears and develops to maturity in an exposed state, not enclosed by any protective membrane.




boletus zelleri



Xerocomellus zelleri was first described by American mycologist William Alphonso Murrill in 1912, based on specimens he found on the campus of the University of Washington.[2] Murrill named it Ceriomyces zelleri[2] before switching the genus later that year to Boletus.[3] In 1944, Walter Henry Snell thought the taxon would be more appropriate in the genus Xerocomus.[4] In 1959, mycologists Rolf Singer, Snell and Esther A. Dick transferred the species to Boletellus, explaining that the microstructure of the trama and the faint ornamentation of the spores were inconsistent with placement in Xerocomus.[5] American mycologist Harry D. Thiers, in his 1976 monograph on North American boletes, claimed that he failed to consistently find ornamentation on the spores of material he collected, and preferred to retain the species in Boletus.[6] In 2011, it was moved to the genus Xerocomellus.[7]


The specific epithet zelleri was chosen by Murrill to honor Professor Sanford Myron Zeller, mycologist at Oregon State University. Zeller accompanied Murrill in his Seattle expedition, and discovered the first specimens of the mushroom.[2][8]


Xerocomellus zelleri is an edible species,[15] although care should be taken to ensure that specimens collected for consumption are free of fly larvae.[16] In his book 100 Edible Mushrooms, Michael Kuo gave the mushroom an edibility rating of "mediocre".[17] There is no distinguishable odor, and the taste is alternately described as pleasant,[18] mild,[8] or "slightly acidic".[11] The original species description noted that the texture was "slightly mucilaginous".[2] The mushroom is suitable for preserving or drying,[19] or as a "filler" to add bulk to a dish.[17] It is harvested and sold commercially in local markets in British Columbia, Canada.[20]


In 1914, Zeller published a study of the development of the mushroom, made possible by the prolific fruiting of the fungus in Seattle in the fall of 1912. Development was studied by examining thin sections of tissues in different stages of development, and the differentiation of tissues and structures followed by using histological stains.[21] The growth form of Xerocomellus zelleri is called gymnocarpic, meaning that the hymenium appears and develops to maturity in an exposed state, not enclosed by any protective membrane. In this type of development, the cap is formed from hyphae at the top of the stem and subsequently expands by growth along the margins; the hymenium forms later beneath the cap in a direction away from the center.[22]


Xerocomellus zelleri is distributed in North America in the Pacific Northwest south to California and Mexico.[27] In Mexico, it has been reported in high-altitude cloud forests of Mexican Beech (Fagus mexicana), a rare and endangered habitat.[28] It has also been reported from Tibet,[29] but this may be based on a misidentification.


Xerocomellus zelleri has been shown to contain the phenethylamine alkaloid compounds tyramine, N-methyltyramine, and hordenine, although the chemotaxonomic significance of this is not clear.[30]


When fresh and young, the West Coast's Boletus zelleri is a stunning mushroom with a blackish brown cap, a red and yellow stem, and a yellow pore surface. With age, it begins to lose some of its pizzazz, but still retains much of its original glory. It is one of those boletes that can't make up its mind whether or not it wants to bruise and stain blue, so do not rely heavily on this character for identification--though I can't imagine you would need to, since the mushroom is so distinctive.


Boletus zelleri, commonly known as Zeller's Bolete, is an edible species of mushroom in the family Boletaceae. First described scientifically by American mycologist William Alphonso Murrill in 1912, the species has been juggled by various authors to several genera, including Boletus, Boletellus, and Xerocomus. Found solely in western North America from British Columbia south to Mexico, the fruit bodies are distinguished by their dark reddish brown to nearly black caps with uneven surfaces, the yellow pores...


One of the most common and well-known groups of edible wild mushrooms are the boletes or boletus species (Boletaceae). These mushrooms have fleshy caps, and central stalk, and the reproductive parts underneath the cap are made of tubes. These tubes open up into pores at the bottom.


Many species in this group are edible, with only a handful being poisonous. The poisonous boletus species have red or deep orange pores. Outside of the few toxic species, some species of boletus are bitter or inedible.


One method for testing the edibility of a boletus species is the taste test. You can break off a tiny piece of the cap and putting it in your mouth. It is still strongly recommend that you identify all boletus mushrooms as close to the exact species as possible before trying them. This technique is not recommend for testing the edibility of any other group of species.


Cap: Small-to-medium cap with a tan to dark-brown. Often cracks at maturity exposing pale pinkish flesh.Stalk: Relatively narrow to medium thickness with a yellowish base color and reddish color over it. Often with reddish base. Sometimes bleached to yellow overall.Location: Coniferous and mixed woods. Wide spread. Often in groups.When: Early fall to early winter.Ediblity: Good. Better after drying. Has a acidic, earthy taste raw.Comments: One of the most numerous boletus species in many locations. Unfortunately, they are also one of the quickest to be infected and consumed by a white mold. If they look moldy, do not collect them. 041b061a72


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